What Are the Most Common Letters Used in Business Names?

One thing that shouldn’t be overlooked when choosing of your company’s name is your first name because it is the first impression you created on your customers and it lasted long as it will be the first sound your customers hear, the first thing they read, and possibly part of an abbreviation down the road (just ask Mr. Hewlett and Mr. Packard.)

At Brandsoo, we give business names of an overall quality score, the first letter doesn't factor as heavily as other traits of a good business name such as spelling, pronunciation, longevity and uniqueness, but it does matter.

It all boils down to pronunciation.

There can be a moment of hesitation for your customers if the first letter of your business name is one that isn't common, or one that is pronounced differently across different languages.

You want your brand to convey strength and confidence, Right? Here's our alphabet scoring method, letter by letter, pay attention!

 

The Oddballs: Q and X

Points to ponder:

Point#1 Brand name starting with one of these can make them pause. the above mentioned are two of the least-used letters across all languages. People are not very much used to seeing words starting with 'q' and 'x' in everyday writing. Also, their pronunciation is also not always straightforward -- two different sounds for 'x' can be found together in one famous brand: Xerox.

 

The Uncertain: C and G

Point#2 Most languages have general rules to help us out depending on the context these letters can be both "soft" and "hard". For example -- the letter 'c' has a hard sound when it comes before 'a', 'o' or 'u' (car, cot, cup), and soft after 'i' or 'e' (cite, cereal). The problem is that there are exceptions (Celtic), and that not all languages follow the same rules. In English, rules don't even help much for the letter 'g' (gift, giraffe), so for those who may not speak English as a first language or at all, 'g' can be intimidating, even for a word that seems straightforward to English speakers like Google.

 

The Quiet Ones: H and W

Points#3 These two letters are breathy but may be easy to pronounce, their silent sounds make them hard to hear. It makes introduction noisy because they are almost impossible to lip-read.

 

The Vowels: E, I, O and U

Point#4 Many businesses choose names that start with a vowel because of the open, inviting sound that starts off the word. Especially in English, the people do poorly on the pronunciation side of the fence and they lack in making up for auditory appeal.

 

The Other Guys

Point #5 There are a lot to choose from: B, D, F, J, K, L, M, N, P, R, S, T, V, Y, and Z. Business names that start with a consonant with almost no pronunciation variation have a lot going for them.

 

Last But Not Least: A

Point#6 they ask what's so special about the letter 'A'? What was the tool to find local plumber or to call dentist for immediate need before the internet search engines? Many of you reading this may be too young to remember incredibly useful thing called a phone book. Yes that, back then, many businesses guaranteed a certain number of new customers by being at the top of the list for their category alphabetically sorted. The desire to be on top carried over somewhat to the Internet age because of alphabetical directory listings. As search engines improve and directories become less common, being at the beginning of the alphabet isn't as important.

However, names that start with an A still seem to hold a special place in our hearts. Maybe because of the open, pleasant sound and familiar presence brands that start with A that we consciously or subconsciously stay in the mind and automatically get a full 3-point score in our book.

Are you ready to get started on finding the perfect name for your business? See our wide range of available names now!